Tuesday, April 26, 2016

Weather

We’ve all heard of someone who can tell when it’s going to rain because their knee or shoulder acts up, but is there any science behind it?

This Q&A from the NYTimes explains how low barometric pressure causes a pressure difference between the outside atmosphere and the spaces in sinuses or joints.

In this article from the SFGate, it isn't just barometric pressure, but humidity that can affect a patient's symptoms.

"Dr. David Curtis, a San Francisco rheumatologist, said he hears of weather-related pain from "25 to 50 percent of my osteoarthritis patients." Osteoarthritis, the most common form of arthritis, causes joint pain as people age or repetitively stress individual joints."

The weather channel has a terrible click-bait article that I will not direct you toward, because you have better things to do with your life, but I do want to include a quote:

"When atmospheric pressure decreases, your blood pressure drops, biometeorologist Jennifer Vanos, P.h.D., said in an interview with weather.com. Low temps cause your blood vessels to narrow, meaning on the whole, blood pressure is lower in the summer."

Which seems to be refuted by this science abstract -
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12441212

So, the jury remains out, mostly due to the inability to control variables in experiments related to weather and symptoms. What about you? Do you experience aches, pains, and migraines when the weather changes?



Don't forget the giveaway this week! Enter in the comments for a chance to win Grendelsong 2 - A Magazine of Wild Fantasy which includes my flash fiction.

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Just comment before the end of the day on April 30th with your favorite short story/short story author and why. That will give us all some fun things to read!


12 comments:

  1. I get headaches just before a storm. Change in atmospheric pressure. That's my explanation :) Interesting read. Thanks for sharing.

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  2. I'm sorry you get those. I'd have to live somewhere like Arizona where it's dry and stable...relatively. :)

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  3. Fascinating. Makes me think that one day weather will be a more precise criterion on which people choose where to live.

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    1. One of the benefits of moving to Montana was getting away from the awful humidity of the east coast. I can absolutely see that as a reason to choose to move!

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  4. My allergies and sinus gets aggravated during the weather changes. Right now the weather pretty windy here. Can’t wait for summer.

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    1. So many people suffer with seasonal allergies! I'm sure the wind just makes it worse. Summer is my favorite. :)

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  5. Weather changes were my first migraine trigger, way back in childhood. I seem to have outgrown that one (just as well, since I have absolutely no control over it!).

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  6. I always tell everyone that my head/sinuses basically ARE a barometer. I don't get migraines very often, but when I do it almost always seems to be weather-related and I do have frequent sinus pressure/headaches with little changes in the weather as well. That's purely anecdotal and not scientific of course. ;)

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    1. Clearly you aren't alone! You'd think with so many people having similar symptoms and experiences, that there would be more data. Now I want to do a study!

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  7. I've always found this fascinating and have been somewhat remiss about not having the ability to detect it (along with ultimately controlling it!), which I think is a fancy "gift"... Sorry, I understand it can sometimes associate with pain (and I don't wish that on anyone), but the child at heart in me still associates it as some sort of a super power...

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